Asian American Teenage Girls Have Highest Rates of Depression; NAMI Releases Report

Asian American Teenage Girls Have Highest Rates of Depression; NAMI Releases Report











Arlington, VA (PRWEB) February 16, 2011

Asian American teenage girls have the highest rate of depressive symptoms of any racial, ethnic or gender group according to a report released today by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

The report is based on a “listening session” with mental health experts from different Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities held in Los Angeles in November 2010.

Key issues in the report include barriers to mental health services and negative perceptions of mental health problems particular to AAPI communities.

The report highlights statistics from the U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) and National Asian Women’s Health Organization (NAWHO) posing concern.


    Asian American girls have the highest rates of depressive symptoms of any racial/ethnic or gender group;
    Young Asian American women ages 15 to 24 die from suicide at a higher rate than other racial/ethnic groups;
    Suicide is the fifth leading cause of death among Asian Americans overall, compared to the ninth leading cause of death for white Americans;
    Older Asian American women have the highest suicide rate of all women over 65; and
    Among Southeast Asians, 71 percent meet criteria for major affective disorders such as depression—with 81 percent among Cambodians and 85 percent among Hmong.

“Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders represent a rich diversity of languages and cultures” said NAMI Executive Director Michael Fitzpatrick. “They include traditions from China, India, Vietnam, Korea and the Philippines to name only a few. Mental health care must recognize cultural differences as well as common concerns inside our broader national community.”

Recommendations include:

    A national strategy of outreach and engagement using cultural messages, ambassadors and social media;
    A linguistically and culturally responsive mental health workforce, including recruitment of bilingual and bicultural members of the AAPI community; and.
    Recognition of cultural influences such as tight-knit family connections and individual and family desires to avoid stigma and shame from seeking treatment.

NAMI’s Multicultural Action Center convened the listening session. Participants included:

    Asian American Studies Program; California State University
    Asian Health Coalition
    Center for Education Empowerment
    Charles B Wang Community Health Center
    Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement
    Chinese American Mental Health Outreach Program (NAMI New Jersey)
    Lehigh University
    NAMI Orange County
    NAMI San Diego
    NAMI San Francisco
    Pacific Clinics
    Peers Envisioning and Engaging in Recovery Services
    Rams Inc.
    U.C.-Davis School of Medicine
    Rethink BPD
    San Mateo County Health Department
    Union of Pan-Asian Communities and
    Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health

About NAMI

NAMI is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness. NAMI has over 1,100 state and local affiliates engaged in research, education, support and advocacy.

http://www.nami.org/AAPI/report

http://twitter.com/namicommunicate

http://www.facebook.com/officialNAMI

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Mental Health Awareness and Education Website Offers Free Information for Veterans and Their Families Dealing With Suicide and Depression

Mental Health Awareness and Education Website Offers Free Information for Veterans and Their Families Dealing With Suicide and Depression











MentalHelp.net


Columbus, OH (PRWEB) May 19, 2008

MentalHelp.net, a site dedicated to educating and informing the public, has announced that additional resources are available on the site for soldiers, their families and anyone with questions about how the Iraq war is impacting suicide rates and depression among military personnel.

“The soldiers, their families and the public are increasingly concerned about suicide, depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other mental health issues related to the Iraq war,” Mark Dombeck, Ph.D., founder of MentalHelp.net said. “The number of Iraq war veterans needing mental health care continues to rise sharply.”

“MentalHelp.net is an excellent resource for finding information on certain mental illnesses and disorders. MentalHelp.net’s mission is to help educate the public about mental illness and the importance of treatment,” he added. “Mental health is an integral part of health care, but is often overlooked because of inaccessibility. Many people are not sure if they need help, and that is where the material at MentalHelp.net comes in. From symptoms of certain mental illnesses and disorders, to living with someone who has a mental illness, MentalHelp.net is an excellent free resource for anything regarding mental illnesses.”

Natalie Staats Reiss, Ph.D and an editor at the site added, “Many soldiers coming home from war are in desperate need of help from a therapist, but many think they do not need the help. MentalHelp.Net has a plethora of articles about disorders and mental illnesses that may be affecting veterans. Two common ones are post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression.”

“There are a variety of other issues that can arise when a soldier returns from war, and MentalHelp.net has information on these as well. These articles can help not only the veterans themselves, but the families of these veterans. Family members can access hundred of articles explaining a mental illness or disorder and learn the symptoms so they can help their loved one” Riess explained.

“PTSD is very common among veterans and can be treated in a variety of ways. Some can be helped by therapy visits, and others can be helped by medication. Recent statistics show that one in five soldiers returning from war suffer from PTSD. Left untreated, serious consequences can occur,” added Dombeck. “MentalHelp.net strives to get the word out to the public about the importance of treatment for these issues and get our veterans the help that they need.”

MentalHelp.net has a therapist finder feature on their website that allows anyone to search for a therapist in their area based on the issue for which they would be seen. Veterans and family members alike can use this feature to locate a mental health professional who will be able to provide the services needed. Other features on the MentalHelp.net website are question and answer sections, an online mental help support community where people can give and receive advice on certain mental illnesses, and blogs written by mental health professionals.

“With all of the information that MentalHelp.net has to offer, help for veterans is just a click away. By spending a little time on the website, you can read about a mental illness, read about the symptoms, and find a mental health professional in your area,” Dombeck said. “This free resource is extremely valuable and easy to use in order to get our veterans the help they need–and deserve.”

About MentalHelp.net

The MentalHelp.net website exists to promote mental health and wellness education and advocacy.

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Discoveries Link Depression And Addiction

Discoveries Link Depression And Addiction










Canadian, OK (PRWEB) October 19, 2007

Anyone caring for or treating an addicted person knows that depression and drug or alcohol addiction frequently go hand in hand. Some traditional medical and psychiatric based programs diagnose and treat the depression an addict is experiencing as the root cause of the person’s drug or alcohol problem, when in fact it is more often a symptom that shows up after a person becomes addicted.

Most addicts are in a deteriorating or poor state of health. While high, they are in a euphoric, painless state of mind, numb to the damage drugs or alcohol are doing to their bodies. They are physically spent as a result of the severe nutritional deficiencies that follow long-term drug or alcohol use and addiction. And, as a result of the addiction, the addict is surrounded by broken relationships, lost jobs, spouses, children or homes, problems with the law or finances. Aside from the physical effects, depression is an appropriate emotional response, considering the circumstances.

Psychotropic (altering perception, emotion or behavior) medications are often used which temporarily mask symptoms but do nothing to cure them. As these medications wear off, depression returns, often magnified, making the recovery process more difficult if not impossible. The best possible treatment program would be one that rebuilds physical and mental health without tethering the recovering addict to a schedule of medications.

To bring about addiction recovery for a lifetime, an addict must be withdrawn from drugs without the administration of more drugs, and helped to rebuild his or her health and life through development of new life skills and their application. The rehabilitation program at Narconon Arrowhead is a completely drug-free program that uses nutrition, natural detoxification and education to help an addict eliminate cravings and rebuild a healthy life.

J.S., a recent graduate of the Narconon program, said, “When I came to Narconon, I was physically, mentally and emotionally dead, not only from drugs and alcohol but from mental and emotional abuse. Today I love myself and know who I am. No more anxiety or depression. I am happy and comfortable with myself.”

To help citizens in your community understand how addiction can be overcome, Narconon is making the booklet Healing Addicted Lives available free for the asking. Indispensable for anyone faced with drug abuse in their community, this informative booklet fully explains how addiction starts, how depression presents a barrier to recovery and how it can be overcome.

To obtain your free copy of Healing Addicted Lives, call Narconon Arrowhead in Canadian, Oklahoma at 1-800-468-6933, send an email to info@stopaddiction.com or visit http://www.stopaddiction.com. The Narconon program was founded in 1966 by William Benitez in Arizona State Prison, and is based on the humanitarian works of L. Ron Hubbard. For more than forty years, in more than 120 centers around the world, Narconon programs restore drug and alcohol abusers and addicts to a clean and sober lifestyle.

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