Health Facts for World Salt Awareness Week: How Salt is Good for You

Health Facts for World Salt Awareness Week: How Salt is Good for You











Salt adds flavor to vegetables, making even spinach and broccoli appealing to kids and other finicky eaters.


(Vocus/PRWEB) March 24, 2011

Salt not only tastes good, it’s good for you. In fact, salt is essential to human health, according to the latest medical research and practice. What’s more, while salt reduction may be medically advised for some patients, recent studies suggest population-wide salt reduction efforts could lead to negative health consequences.

With World Salt Awareness Week March 21-28, the Salt Institute, the world’s foremost authority on salt, is highlighting the myriad health benefits of salt.

“Salt is a no-calorie health food that adds flavor to other health foods, like green vegetables,” said Lori Roman, president of the Salt Institute. “It’s not an exaggeration to say salt is an essential nutrient because without it we die. With it, we enjoy so many health benefits we can’t list them all.”

Whether it’s the saline solution used in a hospital emergency room or dietary therapy to treat or prevent health threats, medical experts have long recognized the important role of salt for life and good health.

Some of the most common health practices involving salt include:

Iodine Deficiency: Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are the major cause of preventable mental retardation. Fortifying salt with iodine is the most cost-effective solution to this global challenge. Iodine deficiency also can lead to hypothyroidism, infertility, thyroid cancer, goiter, poor cognition, lethargy, and decreased labor productivity in adults. Restricting salt intake could increase risk of iodine deficiency, particularly among women, according to a 2010 study published in the American Journal of Hypertension.

Oral Rehydration Therapy: Scientific studies have confirmed the importance of a balance of electrolytes: sodium, calcium, potassium and magnesium. After exercise it is necessary to replace not only the water lost through perspiration, but the electrolyte sodium. When diarrhea dehydrates the body, medical professionals use a combination of salt, sugar and water called oral rehydration therapy (ORT). The British Medical Journal called ORT potentially “the most important medical advance of [the 20th] century.”

Hyponatremia: When the body loses electrolytes, either from perspiration, diarrhea or over-rehydration with water, “water intoxication” or hyponatremia occurs. Severe hyponatremia is a medical emergency. Symptoms range from mild to severe and can include nausea, muscle cramps, disorientation, confusion, seizures, coma or death. To avoid this condition, medical authorities advise marathon runners and others prone to hyponatremia to consume extra salt. At athletic events, doctors tell athletes showing the first sign of symptoms to drink a sodium sports drink or eat salty foods.

Diabetes: Our bodies need salt to maintain healthy levels of insulin. Low-salt diets can impair insulin sensitivity, reducing the body’s ability to metabolize glucose and leading, potentially, to Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. A recent study from Harvard Medical School links reduced salt intakes to an increase in insulin resistance, the condition that is a precursor to Type 2 Diabetes. Two other studies just out of Australia showed that individuals with type I or type II diabetes die in much greater numbers when placed on a salt restricted diet.

Elderly Falls: Because of declining renal function in the aging body, the kidneys retain less sodium. Changes in the intestinal function sometimes also lead to reduced absorption of many nutrients. These changes expose the elderly to an increased risk of hyponatremia. Recent studies have shown that elderly people with hyponatremia have more falls and broken hips and a decrease in cognitive abilities. As one Canadian cardiologist put it, “Spending your golden years in a retirement home with a low-salt diet will convert your last years to a long, chronic illness.”

On Monday, March 28, at 7 a.m., The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television will feature Salt Institute President Lori Roman and Morton Satin, SI’s vice president of science and research, to discuss how salt is good for you.

For more information about the benefits of salt, go to Salt Health at http://www.salthealth.org.

About the Salt Institute

The Salt Institute is a nonprofit trade association, based in Alexandria, Virginia, advocating responsible uses of salt (sodium chloride), particularly to ensure winter roadway safety, quality water and healthy nutrition. The Institute was founded in 1914 and consists of the world’s leading salt companies.

# # #





















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Breaking the Silence, Shattering the Myths: A Community Leadership Dialogue to Launch Mental Health Awareness Month at Detroit Central City Community Mental Health, Inc.

Breaking the Silence, Shattering the Myths: A Community Leadership Dialogue to Launch Mental Health Awareness Month at Detroit Central City Community Mental Health, Inc.










Detroit, MI (PRWEB) April 29, 2011

With one in five Americans struggling with mental illness at sometime in their lives, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, one of the area’s oldest community mental health organizations, Detroit Central City Community Mental Health, is bringing together elected officials and media with clients and healthcare, community and business leaders to have a candid discussion about the common cause of mental illness and community mental health. Mental Health Awareness Month will launch in Detroit with an unprecedented cross-sector leadership dialogue led by Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley, Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon and Detroit Central City Community Mental Health President & CEO Irva-Faber Bermudez on Wednesday, May 4, 2011 from 6pm – 8:30pm.

Simultaneously, a 30-second public service announcement featuring Napoloen, Faber-Bermudez, Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy, Detroit Police Chief Ralph L. Godbee, Jr., Henry Ford Health System President and CEO Nancy Schlichting and Bishop Edgar L. Vann will air on several TV and cable channels. The PSA is designed to celebrate Detroit Central City’s 40 years of unwavering service, while bringing awareness and encouraging people to support community mental health and seek help for mental illness if needed. “We shouldn’t have to wait for high profile examples of mental illness, left unchecked and untreated, to have a discussion about mental health and wellness. The dialogue and campaign will bring awareness of the growing demand for mental health services, encourage people to seek help, and not feel ashamed to do so,” said Irva Faber-Bermudez.

Located in the heart of Midtown Detroit, the dialogue will include discussion about healthcare and the fact that “there is no health without mental health,” said Nancy Schlichting, Detroit Central City’s 2010 mental health hero award recipient. Participants will also discuss how mental health and wellness plays a leading role in the 15 x 15 movement to bring 15,000 new residents to Midtown by 2015; how law enforcement, legislators, businesses, non-profit organizations, practitioners and healthcare officials bonds can be strengthened to positively affect mental health and wellness; how the media plays a crucial role in erasing the stigma; and how innovative collaborations are working to serve all who seek help.

Participants, to date, include: U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow, U.S. Congressman John Conyers, Lt. Governor Brian Calley; Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon; Detroit Deputy Mayor Saul Green; Detroit Police Chief Ralph Godbee; Judge Timothy Kenny of the Wayne County Third Circuit Court; Dr. Valerie Parisi, Dean of the Wayne State University School of Medicine; Dr. Yvonne Anthony, Director of the City of Detroit Health and Wellness Promotion; Dr. Reginald Eadie, President of Detroit Receiving Hospital; Dr. Robert Lagrou of Henry Ford Health System; William Heaphy, Deputy Chief Assistant Prosecutor, Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office; Tamela Aikens of the Michigan Prisoner Re-Entry Initiative; Giancarlo Guzman of United Way of Southeast Michigan; Bishop Edgar L. Vann of Second Ebenezer Church; Marc Scheuer, Vice President of Comerica Bank; Dr. Alireza Amirsadri, Chief of Psychiatry at Detroit Receiving Hospital; Jeff Gerritt, Editorial Writer of the Detroit Free Press Editorial Board; Jay Greene, Senior Healthcare Reporter for Crain’s Detroit Business, Bankole Thompson of the Michigan Chronicle, and many others. Ron Savage, Fox 2 Anchor and Reporter will serve as moderator.

Detroit Central City, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, thanks Henry Ford Health System, Health Alliance Plan and Pfizer Pharmaceuticals for their sponsorship and participation in this program. Detroit Central City is conveniently located at 10 Peterboro, corner of Woodward, in Detroit. Parking will be available at the Detroit Central City gated lot on Peterboro as well as the Michigan State University lot on Woodward.

# # #









Attachments






















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







ApplesforHealth.com Brings Health and Awareness to the Internet Public

ApplesforHealth.com Brings Health and Awareness to the Internet Public










(PRWEB) February 16, 2005

In today’s age of health and fitness, people are continuously looking for the best resources for information. Often, men and women find themselves bouncing from one site to another and performing search after search in order to locate the news and information they desire. ApplesforHealth.com (http://www.applesforhealth.com) was founded with these people in mind. The goal at Applesforhealth.com is to be the premier global provider of information to the readership regarding breaking medical technology news and disease research that is important to men, women, and children of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

ApplesforHealth.com has grown into a player in the online health industry by staying on top of current health events. The ApplesforHealth.com e-zine is published each week with over 60 fresh articles and links for healthy living and nutritious recipes. These articles are scattered throughout 20 channels of health information. For instance, readers can visit the Global Health Channel to find the latest on health issues affecting the world as well as global health breakthroughs. Recently, ApplesforHealth.com published articles regarding a breakthrough in the treatment of Hepatitis C as well as the effects of Hyperbaric treatments on coma patients. Readers can also access the ApplesforHealth.com search engine, which contains well over 25,000 articles, recipes and resources. ApplesforHealth.com has even made the site accessible for people of different nationalities by adding a translator service that enables readers to view the site in 8 different languages, thus enhancing the goal to be a global provider of health information.

However, the bread and butter for AppleforHealth.com is the extensive database of recipes. Readers visiting the Healthy Recipes channel will find a plethora of recipes like Family Favorites, Low Calorie Recipes, and Vegetarian Recipes just to name a few. Recipe hunters will also find many helpful links to other recipe and diet websites, which is what makes ApplesforHealth.com so useful. All of this recipe information has enabled the company to climb its way up the Google rankings for healthy recipe related keywords.

ApplesforHealth.com was started in 1999 with a small budget and a 1-person workforce, which is what makes its story so unique. With virtually no advertising or promotion, ApplesforHealth.com has grown organically by constant addition of useful content and a careful selection of links. Today, the website sees approximately 230,000 visitors a month and growing and is ranked in the top 8% of all websites on the Internet.

For more information visit http://www.applesforhealth.com

# # #


















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Taking It to the Streets: National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month Begins July 1

Taking It to the Streets: National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month Begins July 1










Arlington, VA (PRWEB) June 28, 2010

National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month begins Thursday, July 1, coinciding with the annual convention of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in Washington, D.C.

NAMI’s Multicultural Action Center and 2010 NAMI Convention are important hubs for multicultural concerns, building on the U.S. Surgeon General’s landmark report on Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity.

“Minority Mental Health Awareness Month is a time for education, support and advocacy,” said NAMI Executive Director Michael Fitzpatrick. “One in four Americans experience mental health problems in any given year. Diverse communities are no exception.”

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month officially honors Bebe Moore Campbell, one of the leading African American writers of the 20th century, who died in 2006. She was a NAMI national spokesperson, co-founder of NAMI Urban Los Angeles and an instructor in NAMI’s Family-to-Family education program.

The Surgeon General has warned that minorities:


are less likely to receive diagnosis and treatment for mental illness
have less availability and access to mental health services
often receive poorer quality health care
are underrepresented in mental health research.

The 2010 NAMI Convention offers symposia and workshops that energize participants for action in their home communities:

Friday, July 2

Integrating Mental Health in Primary Care (10:45 a.m.)

People with mental illnesses die on average 25 years earlier than other Americans. For minority communities, shortages of mental health professionals and limited access to quality mental health care makes integration of mental health in primary care especially urgent.

Multicultural Mental Health Research (2:00 p.m.)

Research must include cultural competence, disparities and ethnopsychopharmacology.

Taking It to the Streets: Advocacy in Minority Communities (3:45 p.m.)

NAMI will review Minority Mental Health Awareness Month accomplishments during the past two years and brainstorm new activities.

Saturday, July 3

Spiritual Practice and Recovery (8:45 a.m.)

Spirituality is often a component recovery, including roles for African American congregations, zazen, centering prayer and Native American spirituality.

Approaches to Recovery in Underserved Urban Areas (8:45 a.m.)

Outreach and support to underserved populations in urban areas are critical during the severe economic hardship, uncertainty and increased need of current times.

About NAMI

NAMI is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness. NAMI has over 1100 state and local affiliates that engage in research, education, support and advocacy.

http://www.nami.org

twitter.com/namicommunicate

facebook.com/officialNAMI

###





















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Mental Health Awareness and Education Website Offers Free Information for Veterans and Their Families Dealing With Suicide and Depression

Mental Health Awareness and Education Website Offers Free Information for Veterans and Their Families Dealing With Suicide and Depression











MentalHelp.net


Columbus, OH (PRWEB) May 19, 2008

MentalHelp.net, a site dedicated to educating and informing the public, has announced that additional resources are available on the site for soldiers, their families and anyone with questions about how the Iraq war is impacting suicide rates and depression among military personnel.

“The soldiers, their families and the public are increasingly concerned about suicide, depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other mental health issues related to the Iraq war,” Mark Dombeck, Ph.D., founder of MentalHelp.net said. “The number of Iraq war veterans needing mental health care continues to rise sharply.”

“MentalHelp.net is an excellent resource for finding information on certain mental illnesses and disorders. MentalHelp.net’s mission is to help educate the public about mental illness and the importance of treatment,” he added. “Mental health is an integral part of health care, but is often overlooked because of inaccessibility. Many people are not sure if they need help, and that is where the material at MentalHelp.net comes in. From symptoms of certain mental illnesses and disorders, to living with someone who has a mental illness, MentalHelp.net is an excellent free resource for anything regarding mental illnesses.”

Natalie Staats Reiss, Ph.D and an editor at the site added, “Many soldiers coming home from war are in desperate need of help from a therapist, but many think they do not need the help. MentalHelp.Net has a plethora of articles about disorders and mental illnesses that may be affecting veterans. Two common ones are post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression.”

“There are a variety of other issues that can arise when a soldier returns from war, and MentalHelp.net has information on these as well. These articles can help not only the veterans themselves, but the families of these veterans. Family members can access hundred of articles explaining a mental illness or disorder and learn the symptoms so they can help their loved one” Riess explained.

“PTSD is very common among veterans and can be treated in a variety of ways. Some can be helped by therapy visits, and others can be helped by medication. Recent statistics show that one in five soldiers returning from war suffer from PTSD. Left untreated, serious consequences can occur,” added Dombeck. “MentalHelp.net strives to get the word out to the public about the importance of treatment for these issues and get our veterans the help that they need.”

MentalHelp.net has a therapist finder feature on their website that allows anyone to search for a therapist in their area based on the issue for which they would be seen. Veterans and family members alike can use this feature to locate a mental health professional who will be able to provide the services needed. Other features on the MentalHelp.net website are question and answer sections, an online mental help support community where people can give and receive advice on certain mental illnesses, and blogs written by mental health professionals.

“With all of the information that MentalHelp.net has to offer, help for veterans is just a click away. By spending a little time on the website, you can read about a mental illness, read about the symptoms, and find a mental health professional in your area,” Dombeck said. “This free resource is extremely valuable and easy to use in order to get our veterans the help they need–and deserve.”

About MentalHelp.net

The MentalHelp.net website exists to promote mental health and wellness education and advocacy.

###









Attachments






















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.