Online Pharmacies Offer Relief as More and More Americans Fall Into the Donut Hole, says DoctorSolve

Online Pharmacies Offer Relief as More and More Americans Fall Into the Donut Hole, says DoctorSolve










Vancouver, B.C. (PRWEB) August 22, 2006

For more and more seniors and disabled people, the gaping edge of the dreaded Plan D donut hole is in sight. Many have already fallen in.

The donut hole is the point in Medicare Plan D when beneficiaries reach annual drug costs of $ 2,250, including the amount paid by insurance. From here on until their drug costs reach $ 5,100, beneficiaries are expected to pay the full cost of their prescriptions – in addition to paying their monthly premiums.

“Unfortunately because Plan D is so overwhelming and confusing, many seniors didn’t fully understand the meaning of the donut hole when they signed up,” says Dr. Paul Zickler of DoctorSolve online pharmacy services (http://www.doctorsolve.com). “The real ramifications are just beginning to make themselves apparent.”

People with chronic health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and mental disorders, or who take several medications are the hardest hit. “Many of them reached the donut hole long ago, and were shocked to discover that after being on the plan only a short time, they had to empty their own wallet to get their medications. At that point, they had to decide between food and their health,” states Zickler.

While Medicare wooed millions of unsuspecting seniors to the D side, it is the donut hole of Plan D that will turn their heads back to the North. “Many patients who gave in to the pressure of Congress and the FDA, and chose not to purchase drugs from online pharmacies will once again realize just how affordable and beautifully uncomplicated it can be,” says Zickler. “With prices 43% cheaper than buying in the U.S., safe products and consistent, attentive service from medical professionals, it is still a better option by far. ”

DoctorSolve, a Canadian Internet-based pharmacy intermediary (license #BC Q37), offers lower-cost, long-term prescriptions. A professionally registered pharmacist fills all prescriptions. A certified member of the Canadian International Pharmacy Association, DoctorSolve is ranked as one of the best online pharmacies by PharmacyChecker.com. DoctorSolve has filled more than 200,000 U.S. prescriptions.

For more information, call 1-866-732-0305 or visit http://www.doctorsolve.com

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Overwhelming Number of Americans Concerned About Their Weight

Overwhelming Number of Americans Concerned About Their Weight












Washington, DC (Vocus) July 8, 2010

Most Americans (70 percent) say they are concerned about their weight status, and an overwhelming majority (77 percent) are trying to lose or maintain their weight. When asked what actions they are taking, most Americans say they are changing the amount of food they eat (69 percent); changing the type of foods they eat (63 percent); and engaging in physical activity (60 percent). Further, 65 percent of Americans report weight loss as a top driver for improving the healthfulness of their diet; 16 percent report improving their diet to maintain weight. Similarly, losing or maintaining weight is the main motivator (35 percent) for Americans who are physically active, yet a large majority of people (77 percent) are not meeting the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines.

These findings are part of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s fifth annual Food & Health Survey which takes an extensive look at Americans’ eating, health and physical activity habits, as well as food safety practices.

“Americans are hearing about the importance of weight to their health from a variety of sources, and it appears to be driving healthful changes in their lives,” says Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA, Senior Vice President, Nutrition and Food Safety at the International Food Information Council Foundation. “Even at the highest levels of government, from the White House’s Let’s Move campaign to the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans, there’s significant focus on an overweight and obese population, with an emphasis on reducing the amount of calories in the diet and increasing physical activity, but first people need to understand the role that calories play.”

The Balancing Act of Diet and Physical Activity

Americans continue to show a lack of understanding of “calories in” and “calories out” and their relationship to weight. For example, when it comes to calories consumed versus calories burned, most Americans (58 percent) do not make an effort to balance the two. In addition, of those who say they are trying to lose or maintain weight, only 19 percent say they are keeping track of calories, which can be a tool for those trying to manage weight.

The Food & Health Survey continues to find that few Americans (12 percent) can accurately estimate the number of calories they should consume in a day. Furthermore, many Americans do not know how many calories they burn in a day (43 percent) or offer inaccurate estimates (35 percent say 1000 calories or less).

“People need help understanding how to balance diet and physical activity choices to attain a healthy weight, but there is more to the equation,” said Wendy Reinhardt Kapsak, MS, RD, Senior Director of Health and Wellness at the Foundation. “Small steps toward a healthy weight can equal giant leaps in achieving an overall healthful lifestyle.”

The Foundation’s 2010 Food & Health Survey captured the thoughts, perceptions, and actions of 1,024 American adults over a two and a half-week period in April and May of 2010.

Additional Key Findings from the International Food Information Council Foundation 2010 Food & Health Survey include:

Awareness and Use of Federal Programs such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid


Americans have at least heard of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (71 percent, consistent with findings from 2009).
Most have heard of MyPyramid (85 percent), but the majority (71 percent) have not used it.
Consumer Perceptions of Food Components included in the Dietary Guidelines

More than half of Americans (53 percent) are concerned with the amount of sodium in their diet and more likely to look for sodium content on the Nutrition Facts Panel (NFP).
Americans seem to be less focused on dietary fat than in previous years, with significant decreases in the number who report looking for total fat on the NFP.
Americans are trying to consume more fiber (72 percent) and whole grains (73 percent).
Food Safety Practices and Confidence in a Safe Food Supply

When asked to what extent, if at all, are you confident in the safety of the U.S. food supply, 47 percent of Americans reported that they are confident or somewhat confident, similar to previous years.
Similar to 2009, Americans still have room for improvement when it comes to practicing good food safety at home including:
o    72 percent (vs. 79 percent in 2008) properly store leftovers within two hours of serving.

o    78 percent (vs. 92 percent in 2008) wash cutting boards with soap and water or bleach.

o    89 percent (vs. 92 percent in 2008) wash their hands with soap and water regularly when handling food.

The Impact of the Economy on Food and Beverage Purchases

Price continues to have a large impact on consumers’ food and beverage purchasing decisions (73 percent in 2010 vs. 64 percent in 2006).
As in previous years, taste remains the biggest influence on purchasing decisions (86 percent) followed by price, healthfulness (58 percent) and convenience (55 percent).
Consumer Food Shopping Preferences

The majority of Americans (88 percent) conduct most of their shopping at a supermarket/grocery store vs. a warehouse shopping club (4 percent) or a discount retailer (4 percent).
Most Americans are either somewhat or extremely satisfied with the healthfulness of products offered at their supermarket (73 percent).
The 2010 Food & Health Survey also covers consumer attitudes on protein, use of the Nutrition Facts Panel and other forms of food and beverage labeling, as well as low-calorie sweeteners, caffeine, food additives and colors.

For a copy of the 2010 Food & Health Survey Executive Summary and other resources for journalists and bloggers please visit http://www.foodinsight.org . A PDF of the data and full data tables are available upon request by contacting the Foundation media team at 202-296-6540 or media(at)foodinsight(dot)org.

The International Food Information Council Foundation’s mission is to effectively communicate science-based information on health, nutrition, and food safety for the public good. Additional information on the Foundation is available on the “About” section of our Web site. For interviews with experts or other questions, please call (202)296-6540.

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Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







New Research Shows Americans Falling Behind on Proper Food Safety Practices

New Research Shows Americans Falling Behind on Proper Food Safety Practices














Washington, DC (Vocus) May 20, 2009

Foodborne illness outbreaks have been a regular feature in the news lately and are top of mind when consumers think of food and health issues, but new International Food Information Council Foundation research shows that fewer people are taking basic precautions that could significantly reduce their risk of becoming sick.

According to the Foundation’s fourth annual Food & Health Survey, more than half of Americans think foodborne illness from bacteria, such as E. coli and Salmonella, is the most important food safety issue today (52 percent). While 95 percent say they take at least one food safety precaution when cooking, preparing and consuming food, the number of people taking various precautions is down for nearly every action from 2008:

    Wash hands with soap and water (87 percent in 2009 vs. 92 percent in 2008)
    Wash cutting boards with soap and water or bleach (77 percent in 2009 vs. 84 percent in 2008)
    Cook food to required temperature (71 percent in 2009 vs. 76 percent in 2008)
    Properly store leftovers within two hours of serving (69 percent in 2009 vs. 79 percent in 2008)
    Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from ready-to-eat food products (63 percent in 2009 vs. 70 percent in 2008)
In addition, only 50 percent of Americans report using different or freshly cleaned cutting boards for each product (such as raw meat or poultry or produce) and only one in four use a food thermometer to check the doneness of meat and poultry items (25 percent).

Americans are also faring worse when it comes to following microwave cooking instructions in 2009 :

    Follow all the cooking instructions (68 percent in 2009 vs. 79 percent in 2008)
    Flip, rotate or stir during the microwave cooking process (62 percent in 2009 vs. 72 percent in 2008)
    Let food stand for appropriate time after microwaving (48 percent in 2009 vs. 58 percent in 2008)
    Increase or decrease cooking times based on the wattage of my microwave (48 percent in 2009 vs. 58 percent in 2008)    

“It is impossible to overstate the importance of following proper food safety practices,” says David Schmidt, International Food Information Council Foundation CEO. “Clearly Americans understand the need for these practices, but they still can do a better job of handling food properly at home, which potentially decreases the risk of foodborne illness.”

Confidence in and Perceived Responsibility for Ensuring a Safe Food Supply

Americans’ confidence in the safety of the U.S. food supply remained stable in 2009, but still only 49 percent of consumers say they are confident in the safety of our food. (See video) When asked who is responsible for food safety in the U.S. Americans look to food manufacturers (72 percent) and the government (72 percent) first, followed by farmers/producers (57 percent), retailers (49 percent)and consumers/individuals (41 percent).

These findings are part of an extensive look at what Americans are doing regarding their eating and health habits in the fourth annual Food & Health Survey conducted by the International Food Information Council Foundation. The survey of 1,064 American adults was conducted over a two and a half-week period in February and March of 2009.

Other key findings from the 2009 Survey include:

The Impact of the Economy on Food and Beverage Purchases (See Video)

    Price is having a bigger impact on consumers’ food and beverage purchasing decisions (74 percent in 2009 vs. 64 percent in 2006).
    Consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 are most likely to say price is a major influencing factor.
    Taste remains the biggest influence on purchasing decisions (87 percent) followed by healthfulness (61 percent) and convenience (52 percent).

Top Impacts on Americans’ Health (See Video)

    Consumers believe exercising has the biggest impact on their health (80 percent) ranking ahead of making healthful food choices (66 percent) and managing weight (53 percent).
    Americans rate their health status very high (81 percent as “excellent,” “very good” or “good,”), but far less (58 percent) are “somewhat” or “extremely satisfied” with their health status indicating that they think they could do better.
    Nearly two in three (64 percent) are trying to improve the healthfulness of what they eat with the top reasons being to improve overall well-being (64 percent), improve physical health and lose weight (both 61 percent).

Dieting and Weight Management (See Video)

    Consumers are confused by calories:

o    Less than one third of Americans (30 percent) correctly say that “calories in general are most likely to cause weight gain.”

o    Just 15 percent of Americans are able to provide an accurate estimate of the number of calories they should be consuming.

o    Still, calories remain number one on the list of things people look at on the Nutrition Facts panel of food and beverage packages (75 percent).

    Seventy-eight percent of Americans say they’re trying to lose or maintain their weight.
    Those trying to lose weight say they’re most encouraged by “improvement in physical appearance” (69 percent); “improvement in health/overall well-being” (67 percent); “increased self-esteem” (49 percent); and “increased energy” (49 percent) among others.

The 2009 Food & Health Survey also covers consumer attitudes toward meal occasions, dietary fats, carbohydrates and sugars, foods and beverages with added health and wellness benefits, low-calorie sweeteners, caffeine, food additives and colors, awareness and use of government-sponsored programs such as MyPyramid, and use of the Nutrition Facts panel and other forms of food and beverage labeling.

For a copy of the entire survey and other resources for journalists and bloggers please visit ific.org or contact the Foundation media team at 202-296-6540 or media(at)ific.org.

The International Food Information Council Foundation effectively communicates science-based information on health, nutrition and food safety for the public good. The Foundation is supported primarily by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. Foundation materials are available at http://ific.org/newsroom. For interviews with experts or for more information, call (202) 296-6540.

Contact

Eric Mittenthal/Jania Matthews

(202) 296-6540

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Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Americans Look To Food To Improve Health 2011 IFIC Functional Foods Survey Looks at Awareness & Consumption of Food For Health Benefits

Americans Look To Food To Improve Health
2011 IFIC Functional Foods Survey Looks at Awareness & Consumption of Food For Health Benefits












Washington, DC (PRWEB) August 04, 2011

Maintaining health and reducing risk of disease is at the forefront of many consumers’ minds as they age. New research from the International Food Information Council shows that Americans cite cardiovascular disease (46 percent), weight (32 percent) and cancer (22 percent) as their top health concerns. Along with these issues that can affect us as we age, almost one in five Americans (19 percent) cite healthy aging as a top health concern.

The 2011 IFIC Functional Foods/Foods for Health Survey, also shows that people often look to food for its health benefits. Ninety percent of Americans can name at least one food and its associated benefit and 76 percent say that functional foods, or foods that can promote health, can have a meaningful impact on their health when they consume them.

The foods and food components Americans look to the most to help improve or maintain their health are:

1)    Fruits and Vegetables

2)    Fish/Fish Oil

3)    Dairy

4)    Whole Grains

5)    Herbs & Spices

“Americans have made it clear that they want to take advantage of the health benefits of food,” according to Elizabeth Rahavi, RD, associate director of Health and Wellness at the International Food Information Council. “But it’s not just fruits and vegetables that can have a positive impact on our health. There are lots of healthful components like antioxidants, fiber, whole grains, and soy found in a variety of foods and beverages that can make a difference in our health as we age.”

The top components with benefits mentioned in the survey include calcium (92 percent) and vitamin D (90 Percent) for bone health, protein (87 percent) and B vitamins (86 percent) for overall well-being, omega-3 fatty acids (85%) for heart health, and probiotics (81 percent) and fiber (79 percent) for digestive health.

Still, Americans struggle to incorporate these key food components into their diets citing the top barriers as expense, taste and availability.

“Consuming foods for health benefits doesn’t have to be expensive,” according to Rahavi. “Just taking simple steps such as choosing a whole grain cereal, oatmeal, or yogurt for breakfast each day can go a long way to improve health over time.”

The 2011 IFIC Functional Foods/Foods for Health Survey randomly sampled 1000 U.S. adults and is the seventh version of the Survey dating back to 1998. Other topics in the Survey include attitudes toward health, awareness of 34 different diet and health relationships and top sources of nutrition and health information.

A copy of the 2011 IFIC Functional Foods/Foods for Health Survey Executive Summary is available at FoodInsight.org as is the International Food Information Council Foundation Foods for Health video series featuring expert tips for eating for a variety of health benefits including healthy aging, weight management, digestive health, immune health and heart health.

For interview requests and any other questions, please contact the IFIC media team at 202-296-6540, Mittenthal(at)ific(dot)org or Matthews(at)ific(dot)org.

The International Food Information Council’s (IFIC’s) mission is to effectively communicate science-based information on food safety and nutrition to health and nutrition professionals, educators, journalists, government officials and others providing information to consumers. IFIC is supported primarily by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. IFIC and IFIC Foundation materials can be found on our Web site: http://www.foodinsight.org.

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Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.