Alcohol Remains the Most Commonly Abused Substance in America

Alcohol Remains the Most Commonly Abused Substance in America










Canadian, OK (PRWEB) September 16, 2005

The annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health released its findings last week and revealed that over 22 percent of the American population (55 million people) ages 12 and older were binge drinkers in the past month. Binge drinking is defined as having five or more alcoholic beverages on the same occasion. More than 7 million binge drinkers were under the age of 21.

The report also said that over 16 million people were heavy drinkers, which is defined as binge drinking at least five days in the past month. These statistics were similar to the national estimates for the two previous surveys as well, showing little change in our nation’s alcohol consumption.

The survey showed that the age range that participated in the most illicit drug use (18-25) also had the highest rates of alcohol abuse. In this group just over 41 percent were binge drinkers and 12 percent were heavy drinkers.

Due to these statistics, the National Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse created a website with information about college binge drinking. A fact sheet on this site reports that there are 1,700 deaths each year from alcohol-related accidents, nearly 600,000 injuries, almost 700,000 assaults, close to 100,000 sexual assaults and another 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 who reported being too drunk to even know if they consented to having sex.

“Alcoholism can often be more difficult to overcome than what some people consider to be harder drugs, like cocaine, meth or heroin,” comments Luke Catton, supervisor at the drug rehabilitation center Narconon Arrowhead. Catton speaks from first-hand experience, having beaten his own addiction to alcohol more than six years ago. “Being a legal drug that is socially acceptable, it takes a lot of work to change behavioral patterns in our culture, and making people more aware of the dangers is a first step.”

Narconon Arrowhead is one of the nation’s largest and most successful alcohol and drug rehabilitation programs and it uses the proven drug-free approach developed by American author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health is an annual estimate of the substance abuse problem in the United States conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The results of the survey are released each year at the beginning of September, which is National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month.

For more information on drugs and addiction or to find help for a loved one in need of effective rehabilitation, contact Narconon Arrowhead today at 1-800-468-6933 or visit http://www.stopaddiction.com.

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Groups Focus on Underage Drinking During Alcohol Awareness Month

Groups Focus on Underage Drinking During Alcohol Awareness Month










Canadian, OK (PRWEB) April 19, 2006

The latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that nearly 4.5 million teens between the ages of 12 and 17 are current alcohol users. In an effort to combat this statistic the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) held approximately 1,200 town hall meetings across the country as part of a campaign to prevent underage drinking.

The spring time is when there is the most attention on underage alcohol consumption and binge drinking, especially since alcohol abuse by minors increases for spring break, prom and graduation as well as the fact that April is Alcohol Awareness Month.

Research has found that adults who first used alcohol before age 15 are five times more likely to report dependence on or abuse of alcohol than adults who first used at age 21 or older, according to SAMHSA. In addition to its negative impact on health, alcohol use among youth is strongly correlated with violence, risky sexual behavior, poor academic performance, alcohol-related driving incidents, and other harmful behaviors. In fact, alcohol is responsible for six times the number of youth deaths than can be attributed to all other drugs combined.

“Underage drinking is not inevitable, as some parents may think,” said SAMHSA Administrator Charles Curie in a release from the Administration. “For too long, underage drinking has been accepted as a rite of passage in this country, and far too many young people, their friends and families, have paid the price. It’s time to change attitudes toward teen drinking from acceptance to abstinence. It’s time to get real, get focused, and push back. It’s time for parents and teachers, clergy and coaches to talk with children early and often about alcohol, especially before they’ve started drinking.”

Joining the effort to cut the use of any toxic substance among youth is Narconon Arrowhead, whose education and prevention program reaches tens of thousands of young people annually with anti-drug messages. Delivering truth about what drugs and alcohol do to a person’s mind and body, whether legal or not, Narconon Arrowhead is one of the nation’s largest and most successful education and rehabilitation programs, based on the drug-free social education model developed by L. Ron Hubbard.

Research shows that parents of teens generally underestimate the extent of alcohol used by youth as well as the harm drinking can do. Parents also underestimate the extent to which their opinion matters to their children.

To get free information on how you can help educate your children about the dangers of alcohol and drug use, contact Narconon Arrowhead today by calling 1-800-468-6933 or visit http://www.stopaddiction.com. Information on the national campaign to “Start Talking Before They Start Drinking” is available at http://www.stopalcoholabuse.gov.

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Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.