Discoveries Link Depression And Addiction

Discoveries Link Depression And Addiction










Canadian, OK (PRWEB) October 19, 2007

Anyone caring for or treating an addicted person knows that depression and drug or alcohol addiction frequently go hand in hand. Some traditional medical and psychiatric based programs diagnose and treat the depression an addict is experiencing as the root cause of the person’s drug or alcohol problem, when in fact it is more often a symptom that shows up after a person becomes addicted.

Most addicts are in a deteriorating or poor state of health. While high, they are in a euphoric, painless state of mind, numb to the damage drugs or alcohol are doing to their bodies. They are physically spent as a result of the severe nutritional deficiencies that follow long-term drug or alcohol use and addiction. And, as a result of the addiction, the addict is surrounded by broken relationships, lost jobs, spouses, children or homes, problems with the law or finances. Aside from the physical effects, depression is an appropriate emotional response, considering the circumstances.

Psychotropic (altering perception, emotion or behavior) medications are often used which temporarily mask symptoms but do nothing to cure them. As these medications wear off, depression returns, often magnified, making the recovery process more difficult if not impossible. The best possible treatment program would be one that rebuilds physical and mental health without tethering the recovering addict to a schedule of medications.

To bring about addiction recovery for a lifetime, an addict must be withdrawn from drugs without the administration of more drugs, and helped to rebuild his or her health and life through development of new life skills and their application. The rehabilitation program at Narconon Arrowhead is a completely drug-free program that uses nutrition, natural detoxification and education to help an addict eliminate cravings and rebuild a healthy life.

J.S., a recent graduate of the Narconon program, said, “When I came to Narconon, I was physically, mentally and emotionally dead, not only from drugs and alcohol but from mental and emotional abuse. Today I love myself and know who I am. No more anxiety or depression. I am happy and comfortable with myself.”

To help citizens in your community understand how addiction can be overcome, Narconon is making the booklet Healing Addicted Lives available free for the asking. Indispensable for anyone faced with drug abuse in their community, this informative booklet fully explains how addiction starts, how depression presents a barrier to recovery and how it can be overcome.

To obtain your free copy of Healing Addicted Lives, call Narconon Arrowhead in Canadian, Oklahoma at 1-800-468-6933, send an email to info@stopaddiction.com or visit http://www.stopaddiction.com. The Narconon program was founded in 1966 by William Benitez in Arizona State Prison, and is based on the humanitarian works of L. Ron Hubbard. For more than forty years, in more than 120 centers around the world, Narconon programs restore drug and alcohol abusers and addicts to a clean and sober lifestyle.

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Internet addiction a Canadian problem, too.

Internet addiction a Canadian problem, too.










FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: (PRWEB) February 16, 2001

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is exploring new training frontiers with a forthcoming workshop on Internet Addiction. According to the faculty, internet behaviour expert Richard Davis, “people who are addicted to the Internet have difficulty cutting down on their Internet use, constantly think about the Internet when they are offline, spend less time with their family and friends, neglect work or school and exhibit several problematic behaviours that affect daily life functioning.”

“This issue is certain to grow as Internet use expands and this is a good opportunity to learn more about it,” said Bernard Monette, Specialist with CAMH’s Education and Training Services. “This will provide an opportunity to begin the discussion about some of the negative consequences associated with using the Internet and to begin to assess the treatment needs for people who experience these difficulties,” Monette said. The workshop, to take place on March 8, 2001, is part of CAMH’s ongoing work to educate health professionals about mental health and addiction related conditions.

This one-day workshop – the first of its kind in Canada – designed to educate health care professionals to recognize, assess and treat Internet addiction. Davis is a Ph.D. candidate at York University and CEO of the online health company CanadaMD.com. He has found that “many Canadian doctors, social workers, nurses and other allied professionals are not aware of the symptoms of Internet Addiction…Canadians are spending more and more time online, and in some cases their offline worlds are being negatively affected. Health professionals need to become aware of this problem and how they can help their clients manage it effectively.”

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is the largest mental health and addiction facility in Canada and has been designated by the World Health Organization as a Centre of Excellence.

CanadaMD.com is an Internet healthcare company, based in Toronto, connecting Canadian

physicians and consumers to the entire healthcare industry.

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Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.